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March 30, 1900

SANITARY CONDITIONS OF PEKING.

Author Affiliations

MEMBER OF THE AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. PEKING, CHINA.

JAMA. 1900;XXXVI(13):874-876. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.52470130022002e
Abstract

The Chinese army has been driven from Peking, the Empress and her co-conspirators have fled, the order is cut for the punishment of the most guilty and the sacred city, we are told, is well patrolled by the foreign soldiers. All true, but those who have lived in Peking know that within a year, unless certain measures are taken, officers and men will discover a deadlier foe than the Empress Dowager's imperial troops, and the death-roll will be longer than it was after the taking of Fort Taku and Tien-Tsin.

Population.  —The population of Peking is unknown, perhaps not being so great now as before the recent uprising, but still close to the one million mark. Some writers have greatly overestimated the number of inhabitants in this famous old city. Peking lies near the fortieth degree north latitude, ninety miles from the sea and one hundred and twenty feet above

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