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Article
March 30, 1900

THE RAGE FOR RAPID OPERATING AND THE IMPORTANCE OF SAVING TIME IN SURGICAL OPERATIONS.

Author Affiliations

Ex-Surgeon to St. Joseph's Hospital of Philadelphia; Demonstrator of Anatomy, Gross Medical College. DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXVI(13):883-884. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.52470130031002i

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Abstract

The question of time consumed in surgical operations is an important one. In the pre-anesthesia days time meant much to the unfortunate victim, whose vitality or resisting power was already reduced by nauseating and depressing drugs, such as infusion of tobacco, opium, etc., given with a view to benumbing the sensibility of the patient, who was frequently held by a corps of powerful assistants, or fastened to the operating-table by straight-jackets, straps or other devices. Dexterity and speed on the part of the surgeon then were indeed desirable factors to the shrieking and suffering patient.

The introduction of anesthesia lessened the necessity for speed, and also removed the disturbing elements which may have interfered with the accurate fulfilment of delicate operations. Anesthesia, when properly induced, produces a tranquility in the patient, operator, and assistants, which is highly essential for the proper and successful progress of the operation. In this, however,

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