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Article
April 6, 1901

SOME ADDITIONAL OBSERVATIONS ON THE EFFECTS OF INJURY TO PERIPHERAL NERVES.

Author Affiliations

Division Surgeon, C. & N.-W. R. R.: Special Examining Surgeon, C., M. & St. P. R. R.; Local Surgeon, B., C. R. & N. R. R. CLINTON, IOWA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(14):962-963. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470140032001i
Abstract

Two years ago I read a paper before the Academy, on "Injuries to Peripheral Nerves," in which a case was related illustrating the effects of a comparatively slight injury to the nerves of the thumb, resulting in very distressing symptoms covering a period of more than two years. The extremely painful symptoms were due to a pressure lesion including the branches of the median nerve supplying the thumb. The amount and density of the connective tissue attending the healing of the wound was remarkable. The healing of the original injury was scarcely accomplished before painful twitching of the thumb occurred. It was at once recognized that the nerve branches were caught in the scar, and it was apparent that relief could be obtained only through surgical means. Twice the scar was dissected out and the nerve freed. Later the external cutaneous and the collateral branches of the median supplying the

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