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Article
June 10, 1893

THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH ALTITUDES ON THE ARREST OF PULMONARY PHTHISIS.

Author Affiliations

KNICKEKBOCKEE, TEXAS.

JAMA. 1893;XX(23):630-638. doi:10.1001/jama.1893.02420500010002a
Abstract

A generation ago, in prescribing change of climate for consumption, the usual medical advice was that the patient should take a sea-voyage, should spend a period of time in travel, or should resort to some locality with a mild and equable temperature; little regard being paid to other factors of climate than temperature alone. But with the appearance in 1864 of Dr. Hermann Weber's "Climate of the Swiss Alps," began a change in medical opinion in favor of high altitudes, a rarefied atmosphere being esteemed the most important climatic factor. The latest phase of this changed opinion has been well formulated by James Alex Lindsay. M.A., M.D., in his work on "The Climatic Treatment of Consumption." Says Dr. Lindsay:

"The characteristics of mountain climates which are fairly constant, are as follows: Increased rarefaction, directly proportionate to the elevation; great purity of the air, and freedom from organic contamination; much ozone;

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