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Article
May 4, 1901

A CASE OF TRANSIENT MOTOR APHASIA, COMPLETE ANOMIA, NEARLY COMPLETE AGRAPHIA AND WORD BLINDNESS, OCCURRING IN A LEFT-HANDED MAN; WITH ESPECIAL REFERENCE TO THE EXISTENCE OF A NAMING CENTER.

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Nervous Diseases, University of Pennsylvania. PHILADELPHIA.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(18):1239-1241. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470180021001e
Abstract

The history of the patient is as follows: Alfred E., aged 42 years, a coal miner by occupation, had always enjoyed good health until the onset of the present illness, which occurred four weeks previous to his coming under observation. He denied venereal infection and the use of alcohol, and his family history was negative. At the time above mentioned—four weeks—while at work, he suddenly became dizzy and weak on the left side, but power was not completely lost. There was no loss of consciousness, but he found that he was unable to talk, although he knew what he wanted to say. He also noticed that he was unable to write anything excepting his name and address. In the course of a day or two he regained the power of speech, excepting that he could neither name objects nor people. He says that he knew the name but could not

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