[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.107.222. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 4, 1901

OCEAN CLIMATES: THEIR EFFECTS AND THE CASES THEY BENEFIT.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(18):1244-1245. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470180026001h
Abstract

We are all familiar with land climates, for obvious reasons, but a study of ocean climates is desirable, because a sea voyage is often beneficial when a change of land climate is of no avail. And why this is true is readily comprehended when the differences in the climates are observed.

1. The climate of the sea is more equable on account of the temperature being varied by ocean currents instead of winds, as is the case on land. That this is true is proven by the fact that the hottest and coldest months on land are August and February, respectively, because the winds are scorching and freezing during those months, while the hottest and coldest on the sea are September and March, because the southern cauldrons are at their highest and lowest temperatures during those periods.

2. The sea air is warmer. While this statement applies to the parts

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×