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Article
May 4, 1901

INFLUENZA AND GENERAL MORTALITY.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(18):1258. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.02470180040011
Abstract

The Journal2 editorially called attention to the fact that while the mortality from tuberculosis is decreasing that from pneumonia is steadily on the increase, and now, in many parts of our country at least, exceeds that from any other one cause. In the March Bulletin, just published, the Commissioner of Health of Chicago refers to the same facts and quotes the same figures that were in part noticed in our editorial. The point he emphasizes, however, is the "grip" epidemic that has intermittently prevailed during the past ten or eleven years, and to this he apparently refers not only the increase in pneumonia mortality but also a proportionately lesser increase in that from pulmonary tuberculosis. There is little question that the influenzal infection is largely responsible for the marked advance from 6.7 per cent. of total deaths in the 1881-1890 decade to 10.2 per cent. in that of

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