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Article
May 18, 1901

THE VESICULAR MURMUR AND ITS RELATION TO PULMONARY HEALTH AND DISEASE.

Author Affiliations

Visiting Physician to the Elizabeth General Hospital and Dispensary. ELIZABETH, N. J.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVI(20):1392-1395. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.52470200032001j
Abstract

My purpose in this writing is to individualize this one and only ausculatory sign as the criterion of pulmonary health, its absence as the positive proof of either functional or organic disease, also suggestions as to the most successful method of restoration and its application to the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

In the auscultation of the normally acting healthy chest, two sounds are heard on inspiration, totally different in production, location and character. The first is the bronchial sound, caused by the friction of the inrushing tidal air, through the convective system of tubes, and is, in varying quality and pitch, always present in health and disease. It is first in regard to the time of its production in the inspiratory act, and, during the first eight to twelve years of life, is the only sound heard in health, the pulmonary system being as yet incomplete. The tidal air does

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