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Article
July 20, 1901

MILITARY DENTAL PRACTICE—ITS MODIFICATIONS AND LIMITATIONS.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(3):164-165. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470290010002a
Abstract

What shall the new military practice consist of? What are its limitations and modifications, and how must the conservative civil practice be modified so as to best serve the interests of the army and the individual soldier? These are the questions with which it is the province of this paper to deal.

There are certain branches of dentistry which to-day, as it exists, it would seem wise to eliminate altogether, namely, prosthetic dentistry, orthodontia, crown and bridge work, and gold filling.

Prosthetic dentistry would be impracticable for the following reasons: 1. The appliances necessary for the construction of artificial dentures are cumbersome and would add that much more to an already overburdened transport service. 2. The time required to do such work is more than could be spared, owing to the few surgeons assigned to the service.

That orthodontia would have no place in military surgery is self-evident to any

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