July 20, 1901


Author Affiliations

Instructor in Diseases of the Chest, Throat and Nose, Rush Medical College; Professor of Laryngology and Rhinology, Chicago Policlinic. CHICAGO.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(3):177-182. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470290023002g

It is the intention of this article to describe chiefly the local treatment of acute and chronic laryngitis, and to mention general measures only where they are necessary aids. The first form of acute laryngitis to be considered is the simple catarrhal type of moderate degree. This variety occurs chiefly in adults and, of all forms of laryngitis, is seen oftenest. It does not confine the patients to the house so that most of them are seen in the office or at clinics.

The chief symptoms are cough, at times incessant and distressing and varying degrees of hoarseness. The laryngoscopic appearance are the well-known ones of diffuse or localized congestion, especially of the cords. while secretion may be absent, or raised in the form of mucus or muco-pus. Most of these cases run but a short course and recover spontaneously, though the patient may continue to use and even abuse

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