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July 2, 1898

THE ALLOXUR BODIES AND THEIR ESTIMATION.

Author Affiliations

CLINICAL PATHOLOGIST, MOUNT HOPE RETREAT, MD.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(1):17-20. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450010027001f

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Abstract

The alloxur bases have recently excited considerable interest among pathologists, partly on account of the difficulties of their direct estimation, but principally from the failure of exact analysis to confirm the "uric acid diathesis" theory.

The latter theory dates from Garrod's discovery of an excess of uric acid in the blood in true gout, to culminate in Haig's teachings, who sees no difference between true gout, articular rheumatism, epilepsy, the "rut" of the springtime, religious excess and masturbation. He bases his theories on the formation of uric acid in the kidney, in a proportion of 1 to 33 of urea, when, owing to not very clearly defined conditions, a portion of the uric acid fails to be eliminated and is carried into the general circulation, to be deposited in the system, causing all sorts of ills when it is brought again into the circulation. Horbacewski has proved that uric acid

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