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Article
July 16, 1898

DIABETIC GANGRENE.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICE OF MEDICINE AND OF CLINICAL MEDICINE, NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY MEDICAL SCHOOL, ETC.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(3):103-105. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450030005001a
Abstract

The following cases of gangrene associated with diabetes which have been observed by me during the last few years, inspired me to look through the rather meager literature of the subject with care.

J. G., 62 years old, was a ruddy and hearty Englishman, who was habitually careless and negligent of himself and his health. In July, 1892, I found that he was a diabetic. As he promptly improved, gaining in strength and flesh, he did not persevere with the prescribed treatment. He was not seen a second time until September. The last joint of the middle finger of his left hand was then purplish red, swollen and painful. The skin on the ball of the finger was hard, slightly wrinkled and almost black. Pain was constant but not intense. The rest of the finger looked normal except at the first joint a red line of demarcation was discernable. This finger

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