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Article
October 12, 1901

MODERN ASPECTS OF CONGENITAL OSSEOUS MALFORMATIONS.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(15):966-970. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470410018001b
Abstract

The most frequent abnormality of the upper extremity is polydactylism. If there is but a rudimentary finger attached loosely by a pedicle which does not contain any phalanges at all, removal is simple.

In Case 1, illustrating a boy of four months, the supernumerary digit, as shown by the skiagraph, contained no bone-tissue. (Fig. 1.) Removal was naturally easy. In the same case there was a partial fusion of the third and fourth metacarpal bones, a condition which would not have been diagnosed without the Roentgen rays.

Case 2 represents the more complicated type of true supernumerary digits articulating with each other. There was also a supernumerary digit attached to the little toe. (Fig. 2.)

Case 3 shows a true supernumerary phalanx attached to the thumb and articulating with the first metacarpal bone. It is nearly as large as the normal phalanx and possesses a well-developed nail. It is held

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