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Article
October 19, 1901

SOME CONSIDERATIONS REGARDING THE HYGIENE OF EARLY SCHOOL LIFE.

Author Affiliations

STOUGHTON, WIS.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(16):1025-1028. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470420013001c
Abstract

The medical man's point of view regarding the hygiene and physical regimen of school life often gives rise to misunderstanding and not infrequently to the most unreasonable opposition from the pedagogue. The physician, says the pedagogue, is too materialistic, is too much occupied with the pathologic side of the child and not infrequently is biased, catering to the hysteric dilettante for the mere sake of humoring the misguided parents.

Under the head of "Mental Fatigue in School"1 appears, among other propositions of a similar character, the following translation, from a paper by Prof. Albert Spitzner, Leipzig:

"The propositions generally advanced, that present methods of public education imperil the health of children, is not only applied to certain evils for which individual teachers or schools are called to account, but directly attack the normal foundation of a school. The censure of physicians does not refer to the harming of already

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