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December 21, 1901

SMALLPOX AND VACCINATION, WITH SPECIAL REFERENCE TO GLYCERINATED LYMPH.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF MEDICINE, UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN. ANN ARBOR, MICH.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(25):1677-1679. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.62470510033001k
Abstract

For three years smallpox has existed in the United States to an extent not generally appreciated. The "Public Health Reports" of the Marine-Hospital Service give a total of 12,947 cases in various states and territories from June 28 to Oct. 25, 1901, and this is not a complete report for the whole country. In Michigan, according to Dr. H. B. Baker, there have been more than 3000 cases so far this year, while the prospect for the future is suggested by the fact that new foci are discovered at a rapidly increasing rate. Most of the cases have been mild, and this fact goes far to explain the great spread of the disease. It has often been so mild that it attracted little or no attention, or. if seen by a physician, was thought to be something other than smallpox; hence the numerous and often absurd names given, such as

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