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Article
December 21, 1901

THE VACCINATION QUESTION.

JAMA. 1901;XXXVII(25):1680-1681. doi:10.1001/jama.1901.02470510036002
Abstract

The antivaccination agitation, which has shown surprising strength in England during the past decade or two and more recently in Switzerland and elsewhere, is evidently rapidly gaining followers in this country. Recent events are liable to give impetus to the movement, which thus far has had but little influence here. The fatal cases of tetanus following vaccination in Camden, N. J., and in one or two other cities, will certainly have a tendency to help in this opposition. It is very probable that these deaths were not the result of vaccination at all, at least not from the virus, and it is extremely doubtful if the vaccination wound had anything to do with the fatal disease which developed incidentally afterward. But the antivaccinationists will make all the use possible of these fatalities to help along their propaganda. Like all such enthusiasts, they are not at all particular as to the

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