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Article
January 4, 1902

THE SPECIFIC AND NON-SPECIFIC LESIONS OF THE BRAIN RESULTING FROM SYPHILIS AND THEIR INFLUENCE UPON DIAGNOSIS, PROGNOSIS AND TREATMENT.

Author Affiliations

Alienist and Neurologist to the St. Luke's Hospital; Consulting Alienist and Neurologist to the Arapahoe County Hospital. DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(1):1-4. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480010001001
Abstract

That syphilis is due to a specific poison that is capable of causing the development of luetic lesions in non-infected persons is an indisputed fact. Whether this micro-organism belongs to the vegetable kingdom and may be classed among the bacteria, or whether it may be found in the lower forms of the animal kingdom and may be classed with the plasmodia, or whether it may occupy a place between the bacteria and plasmodia must be determined by the scientific investigator. We are as ignorant of the true nature of the virus as was Fernelius, when nearly 400 years ago he formulated the seven laws of syphilis. Syphilis of the brain can not be acquired except the virus enter the blood or other juices of the body through a denuded mucous or cutaneous surface. From the external manifestations of syphilis that we are able to observe, we are justified in reasoning

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