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Article
January 4, 1902

THE NERVOUS RELATION IN DISEASES OF THE NUTRITIVE SYSTEM.

Author Affiliations

NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(1):7-9. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480010007001b
Abstract

We may postulate as a general statement that those who have given attention to the causal relations of American dyspepsia are agreed that our social habits, our methods of business, our irregularities and excesses of diet, and our nerve excitability, lie at the bottom of most of our stomach troubles. As a single causal factor it would be agreed that the wear and tear incident upon our excessive nerve activities as a people are much too severe for the maintenance of gastric integrity. The strain almost continuously put upon the central nervous system reacts disastrously at the sympathetic foci of food conversion. Nevertheless, it is not the amount of work actually done, not the muscular exertion nor the nerve labor in itself that are responsible for the diseases of the stomach and intestine; but it is the manner in which the work is done, the excitement and irritation to which

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