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Article
January 4, 1902

THE STATE OF THE BLOOD ASSOCIATED WITH ADRENAL DISEASE.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(1):36. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.02480010040003
Abstract

From the first description by Addison of the symptomatology of adrenal disease, anemia has been considered one of the characteristic symptoms, but there have been wide differences of opinion as to the number of red and white blood corpuscles and the percentage of hemoglobin, both in animals from which the adrenal glands were removed and in human beings presenting evidences of adrenal disease. Addison himself reported a case in which the number of leucocytes was increased. Some observers believe that there is a reduction in the total amount of blood, and an alteration in its composition, rather than any numerical change in the formed elements. Others, however, have reported a marked diminution in the number of red blood corpuscles, as well as a marked deficiency in the amount of fibrin. By some, the blood conditions have been described as normal, while others have found an increase in the number of

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