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Article
April 26, 1902

THE RELATIONSHIP OF ANTISTREPTOCOCCUS SERUM TO THE TREATMENT OF PUERPERAL SEPSIS.

Author Affiliations

Ex-President Michigan State Medical Society; President United States Pension Examining Board at Lansing; State Inspector of Communicable Diseases; Member of the Michigan State Board of Registration in Medicine, Etc. LANSING, MICH.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(17):1060-1063. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480170014001b
Abstract

Since the first disturbances of unknown origin in the puerperal state, up to the time of Semmelweiss, who stimulated investigation of fever in the puerperal state, this subject has been the bone of contention and the modus operandi for its successful treatment has been the highest aim of all clinicians.

Serum therapy has been deemed ideal for the treatment of diseases due to specific organisms. Pasteur, Koch, Behring and others contended that the bodily functions in the destruction of toxins could be increased by the introduction of the attenuated serum of those definite organisms. Theoretically this worked admirably, but thus far the only successes are in diphtheria and tetanus, and in the many experiments conducted with antistreptococcus serum we do not in all the literature find one report of its value in the prevention of infection from the streptococcus. In animal experimentation, J. Petruschy1 says: "The protective power against

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