[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 50.16.107.222. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
May 24, 1902

TWO CASES OF PERIPHERAL GANGRENE ASSOCIATED WITH LOCALIZED DISEASE OF THE ARTERIES.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSORS OF SURGERY IN THE UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA. SAN FRANCISCO, CAL.

JAMA. 1902;XXXVIII(21):1370-1371. doi:10.1001/jama.1902.62480210028002a

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

HISTORY OF CASE ONE. 

Case 1.  —By Dr. Sherman. The patient is a man aged about 40. He has had no serious illness since childhood, when he had an attack of scarlatina, following which he was unable to walk for four months. He has not had syphilis. He has some dry eczema upon his forehead and about the joints. He eats well. His bowel and bladder functions are normal and he sleeps well. He has no sugar nor albumin in his urine.He gives a long account of the conditions which led to the removal of his left leg. About 1878, when it was the fashion to wear low shoes with large buckles, he had a severe pain at the top of the left instep and so discarded his buckle shoes. For some time he was then free from pain, but after awhile it returned with greater severity; it was

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×