[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.166.48.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
September 10, 1898

A CONSIDERATION OF SOME OF THE REMOTE SYMPTOMS AND COMPLICATIONS OF A PELVIC DISEASE.

Author Affiliations

SALT LAKE CITY.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(11):576-578. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450110018001e

This article is only available in the PDF format. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables.

Abstract

The existence of an intimate relationship between diseases of the female generative organs and morbid conditions and functional disorders in other parts of the body was known and appreciated in the earliest days of gynecology. The older gynecologists, guided as they were by clinical observations alone, and misled by a false pathology, based upon speculations and guesses, regarded these conditions and disorders as expressions of a mysterious, sympathetic or nervous influence that these organs, when diseased, exercised over remote parts of the body. For many years such obscure, vague and indefinite explanations satisfied the arm-chair theorist and furnished guidance and consolation to the office gynecologist and his patients. So long as our knowledge of pelvic disease was limited to conjectures suggested by the position of the uterus, the character of the vaginal discharge, the appearance of the os, etc., and our treatments were confined to applications, poultices, injections and sedatives,

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×