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Article
September 10, 1898

THE INVASION OF PORTO RICO FROM A MEDICAL STANDPOINT.

Author Affiliations

CHIEF OF THE OPERATING STAFF WITH THE ARMY IN THE FIELD.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(11):594-599. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450110036001k

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Abstract

The occupation of Cuba and the Philippine Islands by our conquering navy and army in such rapid succession seemed to increase the desire of conquest and opportunities to test the strength of our arms. With the destruction of the weak navy of our enemy there was nothing in the way of sending troops to any of the many Spanish possessions. The fall of the heroic Cervera and his faithful little band, off the harbor of Santiago, before the murderous fire of our wellequipped fleet cleared the pathways of the ocean of further sources of danger. It was but natural that the beautiful island of Porto Rico, one of Spain's most valuable possessions, should have been selected by the military authorities as the next objective point for contention. Repeated attacks by our navy on its best stronghold, San Juan, had failed to bring about surrender and to gain a foothold on

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