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Article
September 10, 1898

TYPHOID FEVER IN THE PORTO RICAN CAMPAIGN.

Author Affiliations

CHIEF OF OPERATING STAFF WITH THE ARMY IN THE FIELD.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(11):599-604. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450110041001l

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Abstract

In Cuba our army met as its most formidable enemy one of the most dreaded of all infectious diseases—yellow fever. The Cuban invasion was characterized by hasty action, a lack of organization, and inadequate preparation. The last crippled the medical department and is responsible for the early and extensive outbreak of yellow fever. In less than two weeks after our army landed in Cuba, yellow fever made its appearance, and almost simultaneously attacked the troops from Siboney, the base of invasion, to the trenches before Santiago. In less than two weeks from its appearance nearly 500 fever cases, most of them yellow fever, impaired the fighting force and seriously taxed the limited resources of the medical department. Fortunately for the army, that type of the disease was mild, the number of deaths few as compared with some of the epidemics in the past. Under the circumstances, it was fortunate

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