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Article
October 8, 1898

THE PLACE OF HYDROCHLORIC ACID IN THE TREATMENT OF DISEASES OF THE STOMACH.

Author Affiliations

PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(15):818-821. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450150004001b
Abstract

The time has come for a definite and precise statement of what hydrochloric acid can do in the treatment of stomach diseases—when and how it is useful, as well as when and how it can be harmful. Riegel, in his recent work1 very pertinently remarks: "While formerly HCl was prescribed in nearly all dyspeptic conditions, its employment has of late been essentially limited, since it has been recognized that it is by no means true, as was once assumed, that in almost every form of dyspepsia a lack of HCl exists." There is much other testimony to the effect that even among the aggravated stomach conditions for which the advice of a specialist is sought, an excess of this acid is very often found in the gastric juice. Could all cases of gastric derangement, including the earlier stages of catarrhal affections, be brought to the test of a chemical

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