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Article
December 3, 1898

SUGGESTIONS ON THE LIMITATIONS AND TREATMENT OF JUVENILE CRIMINALS.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Mental Diseases, Materia Medica and Therapeutics, Rush Medical College; Professor of Nervous Diseases Woman's Medical College, Northwestern University. CHICAGO, ILL.

JAMA. 1898;XXXI(23):1333. doi:10.1001/jama.1898.92450230005001a

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Abstract

The growth of the criminal class is nearly three times greater than the growth of the population. Such is a reasonable deduction from the publication of the Eleventh Census of the United States, and this blot on our civilization demands treatment.

It is a great question—one that can not be settled by the courts and the church. It contains within it many problems that can only be solved by the wise physician. Crime has a physical basis; biologic conditions are directly and indirectly important factors in determining human action. Conditions more or less pathologic exercise a most important rôle in the production of crime. It requires but a glance at the inmates of a reformatory or penitentiary to satisfy oneself that criminals are physically inferior, exhibiting on every side stigmata of degeneracy. They have features that differentiate them from their more fortunate brethren. They come into the world—at least 30

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