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Article
February 25, 1899

REPORT ON MASSAGE.EFFECT OF MASSAGE ON THE BLOOD—MASSAGE IN AFFECTIONS OF THE HEART—MASSAGE IN SURGERY. PAPER NO. II.

Author Affiliations

BOSTON, MASS.

JAMA. 1899;XXXII(8):410-412. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450350014002e
Abstract

EFFECTS OF MASSAGE ON THE NUMBER AND HEMOGLOBIN VALUE OF RED-BLOOD CELLS.  One of the most interesting and elaborate investigations in the past few years is that of Dr. J. K. Mitchell into the effect of general massage on the blood.1 These observations were made upon thirtyfive people, a few of whom were well, but most of them were suffering from anemia, slight or severe; anemia from hemorrhage and from toxic causes, from chlorosis, from senile and other malnutritions, and one from pernicious anemia. As a rule, in nearly all the cases after massage, there was found a great increase in the number of red globules, and in about half the cases an addition to the hemoglobin also. This increase was found to be greatest at the end of an hour after massage, and after this it slowly decreased. This decrease was postponed more and more when the massage

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