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Article
April 15, 1899

NAPHTHALIN IN TYPHOID FEVER.A REMEDY IN PREVENTING INTESTINAL PUTREFACTION AND TYMPANITES.

Author Affiliations

Assistant Physician Out-Patient Department of Howard Hospital; Physician to Out-Patient Department for Diseases of Children, St. Joseph's Hospital. PHILADELPHIA, PA.

JAMA. 1899;XXXII(15):809-811. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450420017001d

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Abstract

At the present time, when the cold-bath treatment of typhoid fever has proven to be of such inestimable value in reducing the death-rate of this scourge of humanity from that of former days, it seems almost unnecessary to speak of any other agent than cold water in controlling the clinical manifestations of enteric fever. Since we have become able for the most part to hold in check the chief disturbing factors, such as fever, nervous exhaustion, and overpowering of the circulatory system by this medium, it is customary to lay but little stress upon any other agent in restoring health to those who suffer from this disease.

If one considers the most important symptoms or complications which require remedial measures, besides those above enumerated, it may be stated that they are meteorism or tympanites, diarrhea, hemorrhage from the bowel and peritonitis. A small excess of gas in the bowel, over

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