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Article
October 14, 1899

SHOCK, HEMORRHAGE AND SEPTCEMIA.

Author Affiliations

HOUSE PHYSICIAN SILVER CROSS HOSPITAL. JOLIET, ILL.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(16):964-965. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450680031001j
Abstract

In tabulating the symptoms of shock and hemorrhage, we usually note the following : An expressionless countenance, pallor, with corresponding coldness of face and mucous membrane, and clammy skin, often slight or profuse sweats, chilly sensations, irregular heart action, with weak, irregular, thready, often imperceptible pulse, and irregular sighing respiration.

These two conditions, shock and hemorrhage, or rather their symptoms, are so intimately associated that I will not take time mentioning the slight variations or the local conditions found in hemorrhage alone.

In the symptoms of septicemia we at first find the essential signs of fever, with often a full, bounding pulse; but later we get the feeble, less regular pulse, sighing respiration, clammy skin with slight or profuse sweats, countenance expressionless, or expressing great concern, the secretions from the bowels and kidneys scanty, and as regards these symptoms they are all due to a vasomotor paralysis, either

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