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Article
November 11, 1899

EYE TROUBLES ATTRIBUTABLE TO NASOPHARYNGEAL AND AURAL DISTURBANCES.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Ophthalmology, and Associate Professor of Otology and Laryngology, University College of Medicine. RICHMOND, VA.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(20):1203-1207. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450720019001f
Abstract

The direct anatomic connection between the eye and nose makes it easy to understand how disease can spread from the latter to the former by way of the nasal duct. Moreover, the intimate nervous and vascular connection between the two organs also plays an important part in the propagation of disease from the nose to the eye. Both these modes of transmission have been recognized since the last century, and referred to by different authors, but Bresgen—1881—was the first to lay any special stress on the fact that conjunctival catarrh was often dependent on nasal catarrh. Since his article appeared, medical literature has had numerous contributions on this and other eye troubles of nasal origin, whether by direct or reflex communication. Appended to my article on "Neurosis of the Nose and Nasopharynx," in Burnett's "System of Diseases of the Ear, Throat and Nose," and to Dr. Gould's article in the

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