[Skip to Content]
Access to paid content on this site is currently suspended due to excessive activity being detected from your IP address 54.205.87.3. Please contact the publisher to request reinstatement.
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
November 18, 1899

CASE IN WHICH BOTH EYES WERE LOSTFROM CHOROIDAL HEMORRHAGE SUBSEQUENT TO EXTRACTION OF SENILE CATARACT.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Diseases of the Eye, Ear and Throat, in the Cleveland College of Physicians and Surgeons; Oculist and Aurist to the Cleveland General, St. Alexis and City Hospitals. CLEVELAND, OHIO.

JAMA. 1899;XXXIII(21):1252-1254. doi:10.1001/jama.1899.92450730008001b
Abstract

Mrs. Y., aged 63 years, with good general health, presented mature senile cataract of both eyes, but good perception and projection in all parts of the fields. The pupils were reacting actively to light and accommodation, tension normal, and she was in every way an apparently favorable case for extraction.

She entered the Cleveland General Hospital, Dec. 5, 1894, and on the following day the right lens was extracted without iridectomy. It was in every sense a smooth operation, excepting that one or two drops of rather fluid vitreous followed the lens. There was a round pupil, centrally located, no hemorrhage into the anterior chamber, and everything was in such good condition that, notwithstanding a slight loss of vitreous, I gave a favorable prognosis. The dressings were removed on the third, fourth and fifth days, and everything found progressing favorably; corneal wound united, anterior chamber re-established, no ciliary congestion; fingers

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×