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Article
January 6, 1900

APPENDICITIS WITH GANGRENE AND RUPTURE OF APPENDIX AND CECUM: OPERATION: RECOVERY.

Author Affiliations

Instructor in Gynecology, Wisconsin College of Physicians and Surgeons. MILWAUKEE, WIS.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(1):29-30. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610010029002

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Abstract

Sept. 13, 1899, at 11 a.m., I was called by Dr. A. Beyer to see with him Joseph W., 11 years old, who was suffering from what the Doctor diagnosed as appendicitis, having recognized that condition two days previously. The attack came on gradually, the boy complaining of abdominal pains and constipation, alternating with diarrhea for about ten days. When he was first seen by Dr. Beyer, 8 p. m., September 11, his temperature was 100.4, pulse 136; he complained of pain in the right iliac region, tympanites and tenderness all over the abdomen; he passed highly concentrated urine in small quantities, which caused him much suffering.

September 14 the temperature was 103.4, pulse 140. Hot turpentin stupes were applied to the abdomen and tinctura opii camphorata with aconite administered internally. On that night, 11 p.m., while the boy was being moved from bed, he suddenly screamed out and became

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