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Article
January 20, 1900

CITY MILK ROUTES AND THEIR RELATION TO INFECTIOUS DISEASES.

Author Affiliations

BUFFALO, N. Y.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(3):150-153. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610030024002f
Abstract

We are no longer in a land of conjectures and surmises in dealing with city milk routes and their relation to infectious disease. They concern the municipality. No matter how efficient its sanitary arrangements, the urban population can not be kept free from the poison of communicable disease so long as supplied with infected milk from the rural districts. They concern the municipal health officer in particular, and from the point of view of epidemiology are important.

We possess evidence perfectly understood, gained by experience, bearing potentialities for evil which are unbounded in the dissemination of the virus of diphtheria, scarlet and typhoid fever. Numerous records of such epidemics are at hand in which the spread of infection was definitely traced to the dairy and its surroundings, contracted from the mouth, nose, throat, skin, and discharges of those in attendance, recently convalescent or scarcely recovered. Thus the materies morbi, which

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