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Article
January 27, 1900

MAY WE NOT FREQUENTLY DO GREAT HARM, RATHER THAN ANY GOOD, BY OFFICE TREATMENT OF FEMALE GENERATIVE ORGANS?

Author Affiliations

Clinical Professor of Gynecology, University Medical College. KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(4):217-218. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610040027001j
Abstract

The office treatment of female patients, for fancied or real diseases of their generative organs, is so common a practice that nearly every woman has been subjected to some form of treatment through a speculum, during her life.

In presenting this question for your consideration, the writer has no thought of condemning in a wholesale way local applications to the vaginal vault and presenting cervix, of such remedies as are harmless, in the treatment of conditions indicating the necessity for such applications. It might be well at the very beginning, however, to make the statement that, so far as my experience goes, the cases are rare among the great mass who come to our offices presenting only such trouble as may be seen through the speculum, and, therefore, require only the application of soothing drugs to the presenting parts.

Another statement that will hardly admit of successful controversy is that

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