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Article
March 17, 1900

THE NUTRITIVE FUNCTION OF THE BRONCHIAL ARTERIES IN GROWTH. DISEASE AND REPAIR OF PULMONARY TISSUE.

Author Affiliations

BOCKFORD, ILL.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(11):661-662. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610110021001g
Abstract

For a long time the important function of respiration has engaged the close study of physiologists, and the intricate exchange of gases in the pulmonic alveoli is beautifully if not accurately described. Here permit me to briefly but emphatically assert that the physiologic interchange of gases in the pulmonic tissues, by which this form of metabolism is maintained, is a process as directly under the control of vital forces as is that of the blood-current in its interminable circuit.1 The dialytic laws of gases evolved in the laboratory should not be employed in the study of the interchange of gases in vital respiration.

The intervening basement membrane forming the ceci of the bronchial termini is a recognized histologic tissue continuous and impermeable unless excited to functionation by its proper vital stimulus.

The ciliated epithelia lining its mucous, and the endangial membrane lining its distal, side are on each side

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