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Article
March 17, 1900

SYMPTOMS OF CEREBRAL PRESSURE IN THE COURSE OF TYPHOID FEVER.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(11):693. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460110053010
Abstract

Cerebral symptoms constitute rather a common feature of typhoid fever, though they appear to be both less frequent and less severe when the cold-bath treatment is employed. Their occurrence may be attributed to three factors: 1. A purulent meningitis due to typhoid bacilli. 2. The action of toxins; a, in the presence of low spinal pressure; b, in the presence of intrameningeal exudation. Having observed, in a number of instances, that in the initial stage of typhoid fever the site of entrance of the optic nerve presented an appearance suggestive of increased cerebral spinal pressure, Salomon1 was led to undertake measurements of this pressure by means of lumbar puncture. The condition was not one of marked papillitis, but the papillæ appeared obscured by a veil or mist, with capillary injection, blurring of the margins, particularly on the temporal aspect, and fulness and tortuosity of the veins. In four patients

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