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Article
March 17, 1900

CONSUMPTION AND COMMON SENSE.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(11):693. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460110053011

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Abstract

As an illustration of extremism, one may quote the recent utterance of a reverend member of the board of trustees or aldermen of Redlands, Cal. He is reported to have said: "If I were to choose between a town having saloons (and no one will question my being a prohibitionist) and a town where consumptives are as numerous as in Redlands, I would choose the city with saloons in which to bring up my family." People may differ in their opinions as to saloons. There are some who think they are a good thing, and speak and act accordingly, but for a clergyman and a prohibitionist the above statement is certainly extraordinary. It shows how far the panicky dread of consumption has grown in certain sections, favored by the extreme statements of medical men in regard to this disease. In this as in other matters of defense from any evil

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