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Article
March 24, 1900

SELECTION OF ANESTHETIC IN SURGERY.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF SURGERY IN THE NEW YORK POLYCLINIC MEDICAL SCHOOL AND HOSPITAL. NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(12):705-706. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610120001001
Abstract

I shall state my own views, based on a fairly large operative experience extending over a period of more than a quarter of a century, rather than read a paper fortified with the records of experiments, the statistics of accidents, or the peculiar views of others. I shall deal only with the two well-known anesthetics, chloroform and ether, and these without mixture.

My early experience under my preceptor in northern Alabama, and at the University of Louisville in 1867-68-69, when I was a student there, was altogether in the use of chloroform. I do not think that in those three years I saw any other anesthetic employed. About the time of my graduation in Louisville, in 1869, I witnessed the death of a girl, about 16 years of age, to whom chloroform was being administered preliminary to a minor operation for the removal of a portion of a diseased tarsus.

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