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March 24, 1900

THE FREQUENCY OF RICKETS IN INFANCY IN BOSTON AND VICINITY.

Author Affiliations

Consulting Physician at the Massachusetts Charitable Eye and Ear Infirmary; Assistant Physician at the City Hospital, and Physician to Out-Patients at the Infants' Hospital; Assistant in Clinical Medicine, Harvard Medical School. BOSTON.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(12):724-726. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610120020001f
Abstract

My attention was directed to this subject by the apparent frequency with which a rosary was met with in the routine examination of infants. There seemed to be but two explanations for this frequency—either rickets was much more common in infancy in this vicinity than was commonly supposed, or else a rosary was normal and not an evidence of this disease.

In order, if possible, to answer these questions, 400 infants under 2 years of age were examined in the medical out-patient department of the Infants' Hospital, during June and July, 1898, for evidences of rickets. The majority of these children came from the more densely populated districts of Boston, Cambridge and Somerville; the rest from other parts of these cities and from the neighboring towns. The hygienic conditions of their homes were probably often of the worst, usually bad and rarely good. These 400 cases were consecutive, none being

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