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Article
April 7, 1900

DIFFERENTIATION BETWEEN THE BULLOUS, VESICULAR AND PUSTULAR ERUPTIONS OF EARLY LIFE.

Author Affiliations

Member of the American Dermatological Association, the New York Dermatological Society; Consulting Surgeon to the Randall's Island and other hospitals; Consulting-Genito-Urinary Surgeon to the City Hospital, etc. NEW YORK CITY.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(14):836-839. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610140004001a
Abstract

Although dermatologists can not invariably make satisfactory distinction between rare forms of bullous affection, or classify them in an acceptable manner, it is usually no difficult matter to distinguish the non-specific from the specific. To this general rule there are a few exceptions. The distinction between syphilitic and non-syphilitic lesions of this character is not so much a matter of form, size, color, and course as it is a question of location, time of appearance and the coincident or antecedent occurrence of other manifestations, often in the nature of unmistakable stigmata. In other words, some definite manifestation of syphilis is almost sure to be, or to have been recently, present to confirm the diagnosis. So far as the chances are concerned of any given bullous, vesicular or pustular eruption in an infant being syphilitic, we must bear in mind that these forms are to be numbered among the rarer manifestations,

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