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Article
April 7, 1900

SOME OF THE ASPECTS OF RENAL INADEQUACY FROM A NEUROPATHIC STANDPOINT.

Author Affiliations

SUPERINTENDENT ST. PETER STATE HOSPITAL. ST. PETER, MINN.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(14):852-856. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610140020001h
Abstract

The subject of renal inadequacy, a term first used, I believe, by Sir Andrew Clark, has become of more and more importance as we have grown increasingly familiar with the effects of autointoxication, and have learned to recognize how great a part the retained products of metabolism—especially those which result from incomplete retrograde change—play in the inception of diseased conditions heretofore attributed either to other causes or looked upon as arising de novo. This condition of the kidneys, I believe to be represented in the inability of these organs to completely eliminate the waste products of the body, either because they are themselves the seat of disease or because the products of destructive metabolism come to the kidney in such form chemically, as to be unable to pass through the renal epithelium or to complete their elaboration into those compounds which can be secreted and excreted by the functional portion

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