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Article
April 28, 1900

CONGENITAL APHAKIA AND IRIDEREMIA.

Author Affiliations

PROFESSOR OF OPHTHALMOLOGY, UNIVERSITY MEDICAL COLLEGE. KANSAS CITY, MO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(17):1043-1044. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610170023001e
Abstract

Congenital aphakia is an exceeding rare anomaly, and is usually accompanied with other serious defects of the eye. The cases I report are of two brothers, aged 21 and 10, who visited my office Feb. 23, 1899. Advised to see me by Dr. Waterman, of Wilson, Kans., they were brought by an older brother who was perfectly emmetropic, with vision of 20/20 of each eye. This brother stated that there were seven children in the family, three of whom, one sister and these two brothers, had some trouble with their eyes; also that the mother had the same affection. An examination showed an involuntary oscillation of the globe—nystagmus of the lateral rotary form—also a gelatinous trembling or vibration of the iris—iridodonesis. The pupils were decentered toward the nasal and inferior quadrant, and would only slightly respond to the mydriatic. There was no history of consanguinity, but one of inheritance from

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