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Article
May 12, 1900

THE INFLUENCE OF HIGH ALTITUDE ON ALBUMINURIA.

Author Affiliations

DENVER, COLO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(19):1173-1174. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610190023001g
Abstract

The following brief remarks are based on the examination of something over 6000 urines in Denver, at an altitude of one mile above sea-level. No statistics having being kept, the few observations I have to make should be regarded as clinical impressions rather than as strictly scientific data.

In my experience, true renal albuminuria is comparatively rare in Colorado. This desirable state of affairs is probably due for the most part to atmospheric dryness and rarity, both of which favor the eliminative action of the lungs and skin and thus relieve the kidneys in a corresponding degree. It is true that frequent winds and sudden weather-changes are a feature of Colorado's climate, so that patients must be warned to dress themselves accordingly, since acute exacerbations are otherwise likely to supervene.

Acute nephritis, though not common here, is exceptionally severe. Amyloid disease is certainly less frequent under predisposing circumstances than most

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