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Article
May 12, 1900

EFFECTS OF REMOVAL OF LARGE PORTIONS OF THE DIGESTIVE TRACT.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(19):1198. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460190048007
Abstract

The tolerance of the human body to surgical intervention and aseptic traumatism, without excessive hemorrhage or shock, is at times quite remarkable. Anatomic structure seems to be so organized and physiologic function so adjusted that there may be compensation for even extensive destruction or ablation of tissue. The records of surgery contain numerous instances in which large portions and even the whole of organs considered vital have been removed by accident or design and life has been preserved. Thus, the kidney, the spleen and the stomach have been removed entirely and successfully. Large portions of liver and of intestine, and considerable portions of brain have been exsected with relatively little inconvenience. It can be readily understood that if excessive amounts of the digestive tract be removed death may result from inanition, although it has not been definitely determined what amount of loss can be tolerated. It has been thought that

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