[Skip to Content]
[Skip to Content Landing]
Article
June 2, 1900

ON REMOVAL OF THE CERVICAL SYMPATHETIC IN GLAUCOMA AND OPTIC NERVE ATROPHY.

Author Affiliations

Professor of Ophthalmology in the St. Louis College of Physicians and Surgeons; Oculist to St. Joseph's Ophthalmic and Surgical Sanatorium. ST. LOUIS, MO.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(22):1384-1389. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.24610220014001c
Abstract

I propose to consider the surgery of the cervical portion of the great sympathetic nerve in certain ocular diseases. European oculists and surgeons have performed sympathectomy for glaucoma and exophthalmic goiter. I have gone further, and in one instance removed the superior cervical ganglion for simple atrophy of the optic nerve. I have performed sympathectomy four times up to July 20, 1899. First the cases will be reported; then the conclusions will be drawn.

CASE 1.—EXCISION OF SYMPATHETIC FOR GLAUCOMA ABSOLUTUM.  Mrs. B. S., aged 36, has had pain in and around the right eye for two months, and examination showed vision in this eye reduced to light perception; tension +3, and the pupil widely dilated. The anterior chamber was shallow, the cornea cloudy and slightly anesthetic, the media slightly cloudy, still allowing the fundus to be seen. The episcleral vessels were enlarged. Circumcorneal injection was present and the optic

First Page Preview View Large
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview
×