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Article
June 16, 1900

SURGICAL RELATIONS OF THE BACTERIOLOGY OF THE UPPER PORTION OF THE ALIMENTARY CANAL.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(24):1568-1569. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460240060017
Abstract

The relations of the bacterial flora of the various parts of the intestinal canal to the consequences of traumatic and pathologic perforative lesions of the stomach and bowel have probably not received the attention that the importance of the subject merits. A good beginning has been made by the recent study of Cushing and Livingood.1 As the result of experimental investigation and study of suitable clinical material, they find that in the upper part of the intestine the bacteria are more scanty than in the lower portion. The varieties of bacteria present are not definite or constant, inasmuch as the character of the food taken into the stomach plays a signal part in determining the kind and number of organisms present at a given time. The germicidal action of the gastric juice is rather limited and some bacteria, such as streptococci, escape its action more readily than others. During

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