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Article
June 30, 1900

ACUTE HEMORRHAGIC TRANSVERSE MYELITIS AS A COMPLICATION OF TYPHOID FEVER.

JAMA. 1900;XXXIV(26):1672-1673. doi:10.1001/jama.1900.02460260016005
Abstract

The nervous complications of typhoid fever constitute a noteworthy characteristic of that disease. Headache, delirium, coma, hyperesthesia and hyperalgesia are not uncommon manifestations at the height of the fever, while motor paralysis and paresis, irritative motor phenomena, anesthesia, hyperesthesia, neuralgia and vasomotor and trophic disorders are not rarely complications. Generally these disturbances are of peripheral origin, and only a few cases are on record in which they have been found to be of central origin. A particularly interesting case of the latter variety, in which acute and rapidly fatal hemorrhagic transverse myelitis developed in the course of an attack of typhoid fever, has been reported by Schiff.1 The patient was a waiter, 19 years old, and on the ninth day of the disease loss of control of the sphincters of the bladder and the bowels developed. The sensorium was clear and there was no pain. On examination, absolute motor

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