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Article
February 8, 1965

Occupational Prestige

JAMA. 1965;191(6):504-505. doi:10.1001/jama.1965.03080060078035
Abstract

To the Editor:—  In the report entitled "Occupational Prestige in the United States 1925-1963," drafted by the University of Chicago's National Opinion Research Center, the occupation of "Physician" stands second on the list, immediately following "US Supreme Court Justice." It makes interesting reading for the hard-working physician who is bombarded with persistent warnings about his tarnished image. It may shock those worshippers at the shrine of the public image, which obsesses Madison Ave, the communications media, business, finance, and even the creative arts. As well it might, for few of such occupations did very well in the University of Chicago's survey.Obviously the public is not convinced that the medical profession has more than its expected quota of confidence men and opportunists. Nor does it seem to nurse a deepseated rage at the profession's failure to be in the vanguard of social legislation. The well-informed, sincere, dedicated physician will take

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