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Article
July 4, 1966

Computers and the Life Sciences

Author Affiliations

Oklahoma City

 

by Theodor D. Sterling and Seymour V. Pollack, 342 pp, with illus, $12.50, New York and London: Columbia University Press, 1965.

JAMA. 1966;197(1):64. doi:10.1001/jama.1966.03110010116044

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Abstract

Modern digital computers date from about 1949, but in this short period they have made contributions to almost all of man's activities. Because of the complexity and diversity of medical problems, it is not surprising that computers have been applied to many aspects of medicine. With the number of applications increasing, there is a genuine requirement for a single publication to introduce the physician to digital computers and their medical uses. This book fulfills this need. It is well written, informative, and interesting to read.

The authors have divided the book into four parts. The first of these is devoted to an introduction to the fundamentals of digital computing and computing equipment. This section contains numerous pictures and diagrams supporting the textual explanations. It is relatively nontechnical, but many readers may find too much detail included, especially regarding the input and output components. The second section, devoted to the processing

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