September 12, 1966

Nonfatal Human Ingestion by a B-58 Jet Engine

Author Affiliations

From Carswell Air Force Base, Fort Worth, Tex. Dr. Fallon is now at Barnes Hospital and Washington University Medical School, St. Louis.

JAMA. 1966;197(11):926. doi:10.1001/jama.1966.03110110150044

AIRCRAFT ground crews are being exposed to a new danger as jet aircraft replace propeller aircraft in both civilian and military use. The danger of the whirling propeller has been replaced by the suction of the jet intake, the so-called jet-engine ingestion injury. The only report to my knowledge of this type of injury has been from the US Air Force.1 In that report the actual type of injuries was not given. For this reason the following case is presented.

Report of a Case  A 19-year-old airman third class with jet-aircraft experience was sucked into the engine of a B-58 ("Hustler") while the engines were being trimmed at 90% rpm. The engine was immediately shut down, and two other airmen pulled the victim from the engine. Immediate mouth to mouth resuscitation was administered by one of the rescuers, as the victim was apneic. The victim was brought to the